Latest News

Neuron loss in schizophrenia and depression could be prevented, study suggests

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) deficits have been implicated in schizophrenia and depression. In schizophrenia, deficits have been particularly well-described for a subtype of GABA neuron, the parvalbumin fast-spiking interneurons. The activity of these neurons is critical for proper cognitive and emotional functioning. It now appears that parvalbumin neurons are particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress, a factor that may emerge commonly in development, particularly in the context of psychiatric disorders like schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, where compromised mitochondrial function plays a role.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • A strong welfare state mitigates the impact of the Great Recession

  • Costs to treat bleeding strokes increases 10 years later

  • For brain hemorrhage, risk of death lower at high-volume hospitals

  • Nursery places for three-year-olds: introduction of free entitlement did not deliver long-term benefits for children?s development, new research finds

  • Boosting use of multi-sensory environments in dementia care

  • Clot dissolver tpa's tardy twin could aid in stroke recovery

  • Exposure therapy appears helpful in treating patients with prolonged grief

  • Omega 3 can help children with ADD, experts say

  • Music therapy reduces depression in children, adolescents

  • Teens whose parents exert more psychological control have trouble with closeness, independence

  •