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'Jumping genes' may contribute to aging-related brain defects

Aging is a destructive process, whose most visible effects occur on the physical characteristics of the body. Now neuroscientists show transposon, or jumping gene, activity in the aging fruit fly brain may be the cause of age-related brain defects. This research adds to previous data from their lab suggesting loss of transposon control could be a cause of neurodegenerative disease.
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