Latest News

Teens' brains are more sensitive to rewarding feedback from peers

Teenagers are risk-takers -- they're more likely than children or adults to experiment with illicit substances, have unprotected sex, and drive recklessly. But research shows that teenagers have the knowledge and ability to make competent decisions about risk. So what explains their risky behavior? Scientists argue that this risky behavior may reflect the unique effect of peer influence on the still-developing teenage brain.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • Off-season doesn't allow brain to recover from football hits, study says

  • Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution

  • Trisomy 21: How an extra little chromosome throws entire genome off balance

  • Anti-seizure drug may reduce alcohol consumption, study shows

  • The ilk of human kindness: Older women with gumption score high on compassion

  • Our relationship with God changes when faced with potential romantic rejection

  • Sporting latest tech toy can make you seem more like a leader

  • Progressive neurodegenerative disorder linked to R-loop formation

  • New pain relief targets discovered by researchers

  • Better way to deal with bad memories suggested

  •