Latest News

Phthalates -- chemicals widely found in plastics and processed food -- linked to elevated blood pressure in children and teens

Plastic additives known as phthalates are odorless, colorless and just about everywhere: They turn up in flooring, plastic cups, beach balls, plastic wrap, intravenous tubing and the bodies of most Americans. Once perceived as harmless, phthalates have come under increasing scrutiny. A growing collection of evidence suggests dietary exposure to phthalates (which can leech from packaging and mix with food) may cause significant metabolic and hormonal abnormalities, especially during early development. Now, new research suggests that certain types of phthalates could pose another risk to children: compromised heart health.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • Report recommends insurers use prescription monitoring data to reduce opioid abuse, deaths

  • Almost one-third of Canadian adults have experienced child abuse

  • Coming up with explanations helps children develop cause-and-effect thinking skills

  • Depressed? Researchers identify new anti-depressant mechanisms, therapeutic approaches

  • Stroke treatment, outcomes improve with new initiative

  • Newly-approved brain stimulator offers hope for individuals with uncontrolled epilepsy

  • Cyber buddy is better than 'no buddy'

  • Innovation improves drowsy driver detection

  • Multiple sclerosis: Review of current treatments for physicians

  • Researchers compare hip width and sexual behavior

  •