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Phthalates -- chemicals widely found in plastics and processed food -- linked to elevated blood pressure in children and teens

Plastic additives known as phthalates are odorless, colorless and just about everywhere: They turn up in flooring, plastic cups, beach balls, plastic wrap, intravenous tubing and the bodies of most Americans. Once perceived as harmless, phthalates have come under increasing scrutiny. A growing collection of evidence suggests dietary exposure to phthalates (which can leech from packaging and mix with food) may cause significant metabolic and hormonal abnormalities, especially during early development. Now, new research suggests that certain types of phthalates could pose another risk to children: compromised heart health.
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