Latest News

Phthalates -- chemicals widely found in plastics and processed food -- linked to elevated blood pressure in children and teens

Plastic additives known as phthalates are odorless, colorless and just about everywhere: They turn up in flooring, plastic cups, beach balls, plastic wrap, intravenous tubing and the bodies of most Americans. Once perceived as harmless, phthalates have come under increasing scrutiny. A growing collection of evidence suggests dietary exposure to phthalates (which can leech from packaging and mix with food) may cause significant metabolic and hormonal abnormalities, especially during early development. Now, new research suggests that certain types of phthalates could pose another risk to children: compromised heart health.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • MS drug candidate shows new promise

  • Pathway that contributes to Alzheimer's disease revealed by research

  • Domestic violence likely more frequent for same-sex couples

  • Physical activity in older adults linked to brain white-matter integrity

  • Targeted radiation, drug therapy combo less toxic for recurrent head, neck cancers

  • 3-D shape processing in brain: New discovery on how objects, places are processed

  • Suicide Prevention Requires Access to Effective, Evidence-Based Treatment

  • Down Syndrome helps researchers understand Alzheimer's disease

  • Providing private mental health service to veterans: Hurdles, challenges, advice

  • Gun deaths twice as high among African-Americans as white citizens in US

  •