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Eyes on the prey: Researchers analyse the hunting behaviour of fish larvae in virtual reality

Moving objects attract greater attention -- a fact exploited by video screens in public spaces and animated advertising banners on the Internet. For most animal species, moving objects also play a major role in the processing of sensory impressions in the brain, as they often signal the presence of a welcome prey or an imminent threat. Scientists have now investigated how the brain uses the information from the visual system for the execution of quicker movements.
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