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Neurocognitive testing more accurate than self-reporting when assessing concussion recovery in cheerleaders

Concussions have become a major public health issue, with both short- and long-term side effects.  In sports, cheerleading has the highest rate of catastrophic injury, with some studies reporting approximately 6% of total injuries as concussions.  Return-to-play guidelines have relied on athletes? self-reports; however, this has led to concerns about the ability of athletes to truly recognize their own symptoms and recovery.  In a new study researchers evaluate the accuracy of neurocognitive testing compared with self-reported symptoms of concussions in cheerleaders. 
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