Latest News

A slow, loving, 'affective' touch may be key to a healthy sense of self

Researchers found that a loving touch, characterized by a slow caress or stroke -- often an instinctive mother/child gesture or between romantic partners -- may boost the brain's sense of body ownership and, in turn, play a part in creating and sustaining a healthy sense of self.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • Even moderate picky eating can have negative effects on children's health

  • Marriage can lead to dramatic reduction in heavy drinking in young adults

  • Frequent travel is damaging to health and wellbeing, according to new study

  • Character traits outweigh material benefits in assessing value others bring to us

  • Our elegant brain: Motor learning in the fast lane

  • Brain teaser: 3-D printed 'tissue' to help combat disease

  • 'Brain training' app may improve memory, daily functioning of people with schizophrenia

  • New survey enhances precision of distinguishing between expectable vs. worrisome early childhood misbehavior

  • Computer games can pick up dyslexia in minority pupils

  • Look into my pupils: Pupil mimicry may lead to increased trust

  •