Latest News

Immune-modulating drug unexpectedly benefits mice with fatal mitochondrial defect

In a lab devoted to increasing healthy lifespans, the transplant anti-rejection drug rapamycin showed unexpected health benefits and increased survival in a mouse model of a fatal mitochondrial defect. Children with the untreatable condition suffer from brain damage and muscle weakness, and rarely live beyond 6 or 7 years. The drug enables the body to bypass the mitochondrial defect by switching its metabolism to burn fats and amino acids instead of glucose, and thereby reduces toxic byproducts.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • How studying damage to prefrontal lobe has helped unlock the brain's mysteries

  • Breastfeeding study shows need for effective peer counseling programs

  • Socially-assistive robots help kids with autism learn by providing personalized prompts

  • After Great Recession, Americans are unhappy, worried, pessimistic, study finds

  • Cellphone addiction harming academic performance is 'an increasingly realistic possibility'

  • Assortativity signatures of transcription factor networks contribute to robustness

  • Antidepressants show potential for postoperative pain

  • Report advocates improved police training

  • Fear, safety and the role of sleep in human PTSD: Fragmented REM sleep may hinder effective treatment

  • Study reveals drivers of Western consumers' readiness to eat insects

  •