Latest News

The good news in bad news: Repeatedly exposing yourself to a negative event may prevent it from affecting you

Psychology shows that it doesn't take much to put you in a bad mood. And being in a bad mood slows your reaction time and affects your basic cognitive abilities like speech, writing, and counting. But new research now reveals that repeated exposure to a negative event neutralizes its effect on your mood and your thinking. The study has broad implications for understanding our emotions.
View full story

Post your comment.


  • Amblyopia, not strabismus, identified as key contributor to slow reading in school-age children

  • Visual stress could be a symptom of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, research suggests

  • Lower availability of omega-3 fatty acids in the body associated with bipolar disorder

  • Rats: Sniff and track, or run and scan?

  • Two-thirds of studies on 'psychosocial' treatments fail to declare conflicts of interest

  • New protein biomarker identifies damaged brain wiring after concussion

  • Fruit flies provide new insight into body's rhythms

  • High-fat diet prompts immune cells to start eating connections between neurons

  • Want to remember new names? Sleep on it

  • Adults aged 50-59 now largest age group in opioid treatment programs