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Home testing devices could monitor epilepsy, drug levels, reduce clinical visits

Medications remain the mainstay of epilepsy treatment, and to date there are no FDA-approved devices that provide an accurate means of detection for generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), or convulsions, during activities of daily living. Two new studies provide data that warrants the development of non-invasive devices with the capability to signal the onset of an epileptic seizure and could be crucial to optimal patient dosing.
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