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Motor excitability predicts working memory

Humans with a high motor excitability have a better working memory than humans with a low excitability. By measuring the motor excitability, conclusions can be drawn as to the general cortical excitability ? as well as to cognitive performance. Working memory allows the temporary storage of information such as memorizing a phone number for a short period of time. Studies in animals have shown that working memory processes among others depend on the excitability of neurons in the prefrontal cortex.
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