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Childhood adversity leads to lifelong relationship, health disadvantage for black men

Greater childhood adversity helps to explain why black men are less healthy than white men, and some of this effect appears to operate through childhood adversity?s enduring influence on the relationships black men have as adults, according to a new study. The researchers state that exposure and vulnerability to stress are the two primary ways childhood adversity negatively affects relationships in adulthood. "Black men are exposed to 28 percent more childhood adversity than white men and the negative effect of childhood adversity on the quality of relationships in adulthood is three times stronger for black men than white men," the lead author said.
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