Latest News

Mental health of most UK troops serving in Afghanistan, Iraq is 'resilient'

Despite prolonged combat missions to Iraq and Afghanistan, there has been no overall increase in mental health problems among United Kingdom soldiers, finds a review of the available evidence. But certain groups of soldiers do seem to be more vulnerable to mental ill health on their return home, while alcohol problems continue to give cause for concern among regulars. The researchers focused on Iraq and Afghanistan because of the lengthy and challenging nature of the conflict experienced by British soldiers in these two countries, including protracted counter insurgency and repeated exposure to improvised explosive devices (IEDs), snipers, and suicide bombers. Their analysis, which draws on 34 studies, shows that, overall, most UK regulars returning from deployment have remained psychologically resilient, despite the adversities they faced.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • Vitamin D deficiency increases poor brain function after cardiac arrest by sevenfold

  • I have anxiety, why is my doctor prescribing an antipsychotic? New drug naming system unveiled

  • Women more likely to develop anxiety and depression after heart attack

  • Gene duplications associated with autism evolved recently in human history

  • Research reveals likelihood, onset of multiple sclerosis diagnosis among patients with inflammatory eye disease

  • Eating breakfast increases brain chemical involved in regulating food intake, cravings

  • Using feminist theory to understand male rape

  • YouTube as peer support for severe mental illness

  • Women driven by status, wealth rather than wanting babies, study suggests

  • Change your walking style, change your mood

  •