Latest News

Mental health of most UK troops serving in Afghanistan, Iraq is 'resilient'

Despite prolonged combat missions to Iraq and Afghanistan, there has been no overall increase in mental health problems among United Kingdom soldiers, finds a review of the available evidence. But certain groups of soldiers do seem to be more vulnerable to mental ill health on their return home, while alcohol problems continue to give cause for concern among regulars. The researchers focused on Iraq and Afghanistan because of the lengthy and challenging nature of the conflict experienced by British soldiers in these two countries, including protracted counter insurgency and repeated exposure to improvised explosive devices (IEDs), snipers, and suicide bombers. Their analysis, which draws on 34 studies, shows that, overall, most UK regulars returning from deployment have remained psychologically resilient, despite the adversities they faced.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • Stem cells make similar decisions to humans

  • Why good solutions make us oblivious to better ones

  • When attention is a deficit: Sometimes a new strategy makes sense

  • Stereotypes lower math performance in women, but effects go unrecognized

  • For drivers with telescopic lenses, driving experience and training affect road test results

  • Will you ever pay off your student loan?

  • Public Health Responsibility Deal in UK unlikely to be an effective response to alcohol harms

  • Immunotherapy used to reduce memory problems with Alzheimer's disease

  • How the brain 'remembers' pain

  • Calcium channels play a role in neuronal homeostasis, elimination of toxic buildup of proteins

  •