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Off with your glasses: Visual crowding linked to retina, brain processing

Middle-aged adults who suddenly need reading glasses, patients with traumatic brain injuries, and people with visual disorders such as "lazy eye" may have one thing in common -- "visual crowding," an inability to recognize individual items surrounded by multiple objects. Visual crowding makes it impossible to read, as single letters within words are rendered illegible. And basic cognitive functions such as facial recognition can also be significantly hampered. New evidence has been found that correlates visual crowding in a small part of the retina to the brain's processing speed. These findings could greatly alter earlier models of visual crowding, and for many adults lost without reading glasses, this could improve vision significantly.
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