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Restoring order in brain: Brain cell regeneration may alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have discovered that when they re-established a population of new cells in the part of the brain associated with behavior, some symptoms of Alzheimer's disease significantly decreased or were reversed altogether. While memory loss is a common symptom of Alzheimer's, other behavioral manifestations -- depression, loss of inhibition, delusions, agitation, anxiety, and aggression -- can be even more challenging for victims and their families to live with. The research was conducted on mouse models; it provides a promising target for Alzheimer's symptoms in human beings as well.
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