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Key player in motor neuron death in Lou Gehrig's disease identified

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is marked by a cascade of cellular and inflammatory events that weakens and kills vital motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The process is complex, involving cells that ordinarily protect the neurons from harm. Now, a new study points to a potential culprit in this good-cell-gone-bad scenario, a key step toward the ultimate goal of developing a treatment.
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