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Social circuits that track how we like people, ideas

Whether at the office, dorm, PTA meeting, or any other social setting, we all know intuitively who the popular people are even if we can't always put our finger on why. That information is often critical to professional or social success. Yet until now, scientists have not understood how our brains recognize these popular people. In new work, researchers say that we track people's popularity largely through the brain region involved in anticipating rewards.
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