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People selectively remember details of atrocities that absolve in-group members

Conversations about wartime atrocities often omit certain details. According to research, these omissions can lead people to have different memories for the event depending on social group membership. "What we learn from this research is that moral disengagement strategies are fundamentally altering our memories," explains an author. "More specifically, these strategies affect the degree to which our memories are influenced by the conversations we have with one another."
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