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Commonly available blood-pressure medication prevents epilepsy after severe brain injury

A team of neuroscientists has shown in rats that a drug commonly prescribed for hypertension can nearly eliminate the epilepsy that often follows severe head injury. The drug blocks a receptor on astrocytes, preventing a cascade of signals that lead to inflammation and neuron damage. The experiments also prove that epilepsy results from temporary breaks in the blood-brain barrier following head trauma.
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