Latest News

Study: Prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke on inhibition control

Individuals prenatally exposed to tobacco smoke exhibited weaker response in some regions of the brain while processing a task that measures inhibition control (the ability to control inappropriate responses). Prenatal tobacco smoke exposure is a risk factor for adverse physical and mental outcomes in children. Growing evidence suggests that smoking during pregnancy may increase the risk of psychopathology such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Research on ADHD has suggested that individuals with the disorder may exhibit poor inhibitory control.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • Couch potatoes may have smaller brains later in life

  • Exercise and meditation together help beat depression

  • Epilepsy at the molecular level

  • Starting age of marijuana use may have long-term effects on brain development

  • Childhood maltreatment predicts range of negative outcomes in bipolar patients

  • Evidence of a lipid link in the inherited form of Alzheimer's disease

  • Teaching neurons to respond to placebos as potential treatment for Parkinson's

  • It doesn't 'get better' for some bullied LGBT youths

  • COPD may cause structural changes within the brain

  • Renal denervation helps to bring drug-resistant hypertension under control, rat study shows

  •