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Stress hormone receptors localized in sweet taste cells

Oral taste cells contain receptors for glucocorticoid ?stress hormones,? new research shows. The findings suggest glucocorticoids may act directly on taste cells to affect how they respond to sugars and other taste stimuli under conditions of stress. "Sweet taste may be particularly affected by stress," said the lead author. "Our results may provide a molecular mechanism to help explain why some people eat more sugary foods when they are experiencing intense stress."
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