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Scientists tie social behavior to activity in specific brain circuit

A particular brain circuit has been linked by researchers to mammals' tendency to interact socially. Stimulating this circuit -- one among millions in the brain -- instantly increases a mouse's appetite for getting to know a strange mouse, while inhibiting it shuts down its drive to socialize with the stranger. The new findings may throw light on psychiatric disorders marked by impaired social interaction such as autism, social anxiety, schizophrenia and depression, said the study's senior author.
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