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Brain tumor cells move, damage tissue; research points to possible therapy

Researchers have shed new light on how gliomas migrate in the brain. The findings show gliomas disrupt normal neural connections and hijack control of blood vessels. The study provides insight on how glioma cells spread throughout the brain and potentially offers a tantalizing opportunity for therapy. A hallmark of gliomas is that the cells can migrate away from a central tumor, invading healthy brain tissue. Even if a tumor mass is surgically removed, malignant cells that have migrated are left behind, and can grow into a new tumor.
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