Latest News

Brain tumor cells move, damage tissue; research points to possible therapy

Researchers have shed new light on how gliomas migrate in the brain. The findings show gliomas disrupt normal neural connections and hijack control of blood vessels. The study provides insight on how glioma cells spread throughout the brain and potentially offers a tantalizing opportunity for therapy. A hallmark of gliomas is that the cells can migrate away from a central tumor, invading healthy brain tissue. Even if a tumor mass is surgically removed, malignant cells that have migrated are left behind, and can grow into a new tumor.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • After-school exercise program enhances cognition in 7-, 8- and 9-year-olds

  • Rising prevalence of sleep apnea in U.S. threatens public health

  • New clues revealed to understand brain stimulation

  • Selectively rewiring brain's circuitry to treat depression

  • New learning mechanism for individual nerve cells

  • Rising prevalence of sleep apnea in US threatens public health

  • Sleep twitches light up the brain

  • The dangers of teens using marijuana

  • Talk therapy -- not medication -- best for social anxiety disorder, large study finds

  • Signature of aging in brain: Researchers suggest that the brain's 'immunological age' is what counts

  •