Latest News

Brain tumor cells move, damage tissue; research points to possible therapy

Researchers have shed new light on how gliomas migrate in the brain. The findings show gliomas disrupt normal neural connections and hijack control of blood vessels. The study provides insight on how glioma cells spread throughout the brain and potentially offers a tantalizing opportunity for therapy. A hallmark of gliomas is that the cells can migrate away from a central tumor, invading healthy brain tissue. Even if a tumor mass is surgically removed, malignant cells that have migrated are left behind, and can grow into a new tumor.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • How to stop a stroke in its tracks

  • Discovery may open door for treating fragile X carriers

  • Fat tissue controls brain's response to food scarcity, helping regulate optimal amount of body fat for brain function

  • New light shed on brain's source of power

  • Long-term exposure to air pollution may pose risk to brain structure, cognitive functions

  • Extra sleep fixes memory problems in flies with Alzheimer's-like condition

  • In search of tinnitus, that phantom ringing in the ears

  • Nanoparticle drug reverses Parkinson's-like symptoms in rats

  • Researchers see promise in treatment to reduce dementia after TBI

  • New brain mapping model could improve effectiveness of transcranial magnetic stimulation

  •