Latest News

Brain tumor cells move, damage tissue; research points to possible therapy

Researchers have shed new light on how gliomas migrate in the brain. The findings show gliomas disrupt normal neural connections and hijack control of blood vessels. The study provides insight on how glioma cells spread throughout the brain and potentially offers a tantalizing opportunity for therapy. A hallmark of gliomas is that the cells can migrate away from a central tumor, invading healthy brain tissue. Even if a tumor mass is surgically removed, malignant cells that have migrated are left behind, and can grow into a new tumor.
View full story

Post your comment.

Name:
Email:
Rating:
Comment:
Verification
 

  • Physical activity in older adults linked to brain white-matter integrity

  • Researchers discover how circular RNA is created, find link to degenerative disease

  • Providing private mental health service to veterans: Hurdles, challenges, advice

  • Cooling of dialysis fluids protects against brain damage

  • Mycotoxin present in many types of food deteriorates neuroregeneration

  • Mitochondria's role in neurodegenerative diseases clearer thanks to mouse study

  • Sibling bullying linked to later depression, self-harm

  • Simple test can help detect Alzheimer's before dementia signs show, study shows

  • Single dose of antidepressant changes the brain

  • Novel mechanism involved in memory discovered

  •