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Blood-oxytocin levels in normal range in children with autism, study finds

Autism does not appear to be solely caused by a deficiency of oxytocin, but the hormone's universal ability to boost social function may prove useful in treating a subset of children with the developmental disorder. Low levels of oxytocin, a hormone involved in social functioning, have for years been suspected of causing autism. In the largest-ever study to test the purported connection, the range of blood oxytocin levels has been shown to be the same in children with autism as that observed in two comparison groups: children with autistic siblings and children without autistic siblings.
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