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Elderly with depression, mild cognitive impairment more vulnerable to accelerated brain aging

People who develop depression and mild cognitive impairment after age 65 are more likely to have biological and brain imaging markers that reflect a greater vulnerability for accelerated brain aging, according to a study. Older adults with major depression have double the risk of developing dementia in the future compared with those who have never had the mood disorder, said a senior investigator.
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